Home News Weather Finance Travel Maps Movies Lottery Horoscopes Games
 SECTION: NEWS OF WORLD ECONOMIES
Search The Web:
DOMAIN NAMES
AS LOW AS $2.99 / YR.
Illicit Trade Threatens Asia's Tigers
Tuesday, 23-Nov-2010 7:24PM United Press International
USTINET NEWS

  Front Page

  Top Stories

  U.S.

  World

  Politics

  Business

    Front Page

    Industires

    Labor & Unions

    World Econmony

  Sports

  Health

  Tech/Science

  Living/Entertainment

  Off Beat Stories

  News Photos

  Weather


Special Editions

  Iraq & Conflict

  Israel/Palestine

  Crimes & Laws


MultiMedia

  Interactive Features

  News Photos


POLL: Your Opinion

  What Do You Think




BANGKOK, Nov. 23 (UPI) -- A black market and illicit trade throughout Asia are combining to present the most severe threat to the survival of the Earth's tigers, conservationists say.

SAVE MONEY ON TRAVEL DEALS

Animal activists raised the alarm as the International Tiger Forum -- the highest-level political meeting to ever discuss a single species -- was under way this week in St. Petersburg, Russia, Inter Press Service reported Tuesday.

"Illegal trade poses the most immediate and dire threat to the survival of tigers. Moreover, it puts all Asia's big felines at serious risk", says TRAFFIC Southeast Asia Regional Director William Schaedla.

The region needs to put a stop to black markets along the shared borders of Myanmar, Thailand and China, the group says.

"Wildlife laws in Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand clearly prohibit trafficking in tigers and other big cats. We urge authorities to bring the full weight of the law to bear upon traffickers", Schaedla said.

TRAFFIC's "The Big Cat Trade in Myanmar and Thailand" report documents black market sales of various body parts of an estimated 400 large wild felines during nearly a decade of investigations in the region.

"With as few as 3,200 wild tigers worldwide, the ongoing large-scale trade documented in this report cannot be taken lightly", Schaedla says.

Tiger populations in the Mekong region, including southwest China, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam, have fallen from an estimated 1,200 in 1998 to about 350 today, Inter Press Service said.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Related News Topics:

Environment, pollution, endangered species
General science stories
International trade: agreements, disputes, stats
Top science, technical and computer stories
Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar
Miscellaneous science and technology stories
General science stories
News of world economies
News of Asia and Oceania
Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar

 BREAKING STORIES

Schumer says GOP would privatize SoSec

Unions: Trade deals can threaten jobs

Russia halts imports of pigs from Germany

Recovery? Large pickup, cargo van sales up

Russia WTO talks could be done in April

Trade limits frame Hu visit

Report: Afghan opium trade flourishing

Funeral held for Christina Green

At trade show: A magic kitchen

Leaked cable: U.S. urged to wage trade war

Canada bans export of narwhal whale tusks

Nation's first carbon cap-and-trade set

Canada urged to stop asbestos export

Red Sox trade for Adrian Gonzalez

White House seals trade agreement with South Korea

China halts Australian lobster imports

Illicit trade threatens Asia's tigers

Settlement for WTC first responders OK'd

S. Korea, U.S. race to finish trade deal

EU to stop export of nuclear waste

Home News Weather Finance Travel Maps Movies Lottery Horoscopes Games
Home :: My Page :: My WebMail :: My Calendar :: My Portfolio :: Chat :: Help Center :: Sign In :: Sign Out

MY.USTI.NET PORTAL  -  1996 - 2004 USTINET CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Please see our Privacy Policy, Security Guarantee, Terms of Use for additional information.